eLatin eGreek eLearn

More wired than a Roman Internet café

Laura Gibbs's Comments

Comment Wall (30 comments)

At 7:07am on June 4, 2007, lsb said…
hey, the audio latin sounds great; i've also been doing some work with distributing oral latin, albeit differently: www.poetaexmachina.net
At 4:07pm on August 1, 2007, Latinum Institute said…
Thanks for telling about writing to Google - I wrote to them about Adler, and gave them the link to the podcast - they said they'd fix the problem. I suppose they will, as the book is being used a lot, I expect their download stats on it will have shot up since I started using it for the lobus disseminuus.
At 3:30pm on September 15, 2007, Seumas Macdonald said…
Hi Laura. I think one of the things I'm appreciating more and more is the ability to connect with people doing similar/related things in Classics, which is so often an isolated pursuit, and have a real fruitful exchange with them. Hopefully this space will grow and blossom like that too.
At 3:31pm on September 23, 2007, Seumas Macdonald said…
I look forward to your Vulgate project. I'd be interested to hear about how you approached teaching Biblical Greek. One of my keen interests is taking the moves towards a communicative, or even a reading-based, approach to Latin, and applying them to Greek, esp. Biblical Greek. I would say an overwhelming majority of theology students graduate with a very grammar-translation knowledge of Greek, and often very little ability simply to read the text - one of my hobby horses and little personal causes.
At 10:17am on October 8, 2007, Raphaela said…
Hi Laura,

Thanks for the link to the Heloise texts! I'm going to enjoy reading those alongside Abelard. (So much Latin, so little time...)
At 11:49am on October 8, 2007, Raphaela said…
No I haven't, but I've just wishlisted Marion Meade's novel on the strengths of the reviews at the IMDB page you linked to!
At 2:02pm on October 22, 2007, Jerry Proffitt said…
Laura,
I am not a native Texan. I grew up in North Carolina. I envy you the climate and the rolling hills. I do enjoy Fort Worth, and the museums are wonderful.
I particularly enjoy your Bestaria Latina. Keep up the good work.
Jerry
At 8:35am on November 11, 2007, Raphaela said…
Thanks, Laura! As for the lyrics, I learned the first two verses as a child, but until I Googled the song on Friday I had no idea there were any more... OR that they lent themselves so well to translating into Latin! :)
At 10:37pm on November 12, 2007, Lisa St. Louis said…
Laura, Dr. Shawn Graham and I loooove your site! We think the look of it is absolutely amazing. Shawn has just got me blogging finally for RWU and we have just done an Amazon bookstore for the school. We get so many great ideas from your site. Thanks for inspiring us. Dux femina facti!
At 6:45am on November 27, 2007, ERIC said…
DEAR LAURA...AMONG OTHER THINGS, I AM A POET WHO IS WRITING A PLAY. SO FAR I HAVE SEVEN CHARACTERS. THREE MANICS (MALES) AND THREE DEPRESSIVES (FEMALES) AND THEIR PASTOR/PASTORAL COUNSELOR. THE NAME AGITATUM CAME TO ME FOR ONE OF THE MANIC MEN. IT THEN OCCURRED TO ME THAT THIS NAME MIGHT COME FROM SOMETHING LATIN LIKE...AGITO, AGITARE, AGITATUM...OF COURSE I GOOGLED IT AND FOUND NOTHERING DIRECTLY RELATING TO MY HUNCH, BUT I DID FIND YOUR BLOG. DO YOU HAVE ANY IDEAS ON THIS THOUGHT? THANKS IN ADVANCE...ERIC (AGITATUM)
At 8:44pm on December 18, 2007, Bill Parsons said…
I am teaching almost excluively online since Franklin Pierce restructured the branch campuses. I am wondering what your experiece in the format is. I for one love it
At 7:24pm on January 28, 2008, Chris Ann Matteo said…
Laura, I have your book and have been following your proverbs blog for sometime now. I want to be certain you've seen the attached cfp:

Call for Papers:

American Philological Association 2009, Philadelphia

Outreach Committee


"Podcasting and the Classics"

Co-organizers Chris Ann Matteo and Ed DeHoratius


In the field of classical humanities, professors and K -12 teachers alike are witnessing the democratizing power of the "podcast" word: audio players and iPods are intimate hardware for both our students and the public we want to reach, and have proven a particularly powerful tool to restore oral and aural practice in our classrooms.


In the past few years, a number of highly successful podcasts -- audio media that are free to download -- have received attention from National Public Radio and other news sources. A few examples of these are The WordNerds out of Vienna, Virginia (http://www.thewordnerds.org), The Adventures of Indigo Jones, Classical Archaeologist!

(http://www.teaglefoundation.org/learning/indigojones.aspx) sponsored by the Teagle Foundation, and Twelve Byzantine Rulers from Stony Brook School teacher Lars Brownworth (http://www.podcastalley.com/podcast_details.php?pod_id=5440).


This panel will explore the various kinds of podcasts that are available and in development, and will explore uses of this new technology to enhance our pedagogy.


The kinds of questions the panelists might address could include:


●What are some of the ways we might use this in our classrooms, in both K-12 and college-level education?

●How and why did a given podcast originate?

●How does one actually get "podcasted" (what are the "bottom-line" practicalities: how much does it cost in terms of money, time, equipment)?

●Should we regard the podcast as an oral performance text?

●What does it mean to have a "timely" podcast in our subject matter (i.e., they are "live" and yet time can lapse, and I can elect when I want to listen)?

●What role do we see podcasts playing in our culture (educational, entertainment, and research)?

●What are the political or ideological dimensions of conveying the classics in this new medium?

●How does it affect what might be perceived as a "divide" separating the classics secondary school teacher and the professoriate?

●Can podcasts be used in our scholarship and, if so, how?

●What kinds of collaboration between academic and media interests have been productive in this area?

●What other uses can we imagine for them?


Submit abstracts electronically to Chris Ann Matteo camatteo@mac.com by Friday,
1 February 2008. The abstract proper should follow the APA guidelines (one full page in 11 pt type; title in upper right-hand corner in 12 pt type) and be anonymous: it should contain a clear statement of purpose, a summary of the argumentation, some examples to be used in the argumentation, and, if appropriate, a brief explanation of the abstract’s relationship to previous literature on the topic. Papers will normally be no longer than 20 minutes long. Please include requests for audio-visual equipment and allow time for listening to excerpts in your estimate of time needed.
At 2:10pm on April 8, 2008, Steve Perkins said…
Laura,

Another Lulu author...how great! I will share your books with my wife, who is the Head of School at Vita Nova Christian Academy. This is a Classical and Christian school that will offer Latin from grade 3 onward.

I have found Lulu so much fun and useful. I have published a number of books for my children through them, books that perhaps I will release to the public someday, but for now are for just for them.

I am quite interested in grammatical issues with the Vulgate, with translation theories in general, and with a theory of translating a translation such as the Vulgate. I am currently reading George Steiner's After Babel, which is quite helpful in this regard. Douglas Hofstadter's Le Ton Beau de Marot is another great look at issues of translation.

I agree that Lulu could be a great avenue, should this alternative testing thing get off the ground.
At 2:36pm on June 20, 2008, M. Fletcher said…
Hi Laura,

I'm creating a small widget on RotateContent.com, following your instructions on How-To Technology Tips. What I really would like, however, is information on how to create a searchable widget. Do you know of any program where I might be able to create something like that? Perhaps it would be just a question of tweaking the HTML created by RotateContent.com and SeaMonkey. I'm not really sure, but I thought you of all people would probably know.

Your fan,
Fletcher
At 8:29pm on July 16, 2008, test said…
Laura,

http://www.frcoulter.com/latin/latinlover/latin_03_18_06.mp3

Here is a great Latinist. Fr. Reginald Foster talking about :
"Beware the Ides of March and Fr. Foster's tour of Rome about the sites Caesar's life and death."

Fr. Foster knows nothing about the web so Fr. Coulters' name is in the Url. Ides of March

My home school kids love this program. They can sometimes keep up with his verbal translations

Eric
At 12:44pm on November 30, 2008, Jeremy O'Clair said…
Yes, Russian was my first foreign language experience. It was quite helpful when I started learning Greek. Thanks for the best wishes with job hunting. I'll be finishing either in the spring or summer, though it looks like summer. It might be more difficult hunting a Latin position when I won't have diploma in hand until August! But we'll see what happens.
At 5:25pm on January 22, 2009, maximus said…
Ave, Laura,

It appears that you the first I should thank for this site. I have recently joined and am very optimistic about finding quality Latin and Greekaudio of the classics.

Bene vale
At 9:34am on March 21, 2009, Andrew Reinhard said…
I killed the spammer. I'm starting to get 1-2 a week...
At 1:55am on May 23, 2009, blake gwinn said…
Hi it is little ol me, I have found my way to your page at last, if i had one more window open on this pc it would explode.
working on three other projects, while your Latin voice soothes my savaged nerves. Thanks for all, you are now firmly among my Hero's!
Take care, Blake
At 9:06pm on May 24, 2009, blake gwinn said…
You are too kind, Sadly I am unable to see ? Audio on the site..... getting a blank box with an x where the bar would be. I 'll try later.

You need to be a member of eLatin eGreek eLearn to add comments!

Join eLatin eGreek eLearn

Badge

Loading…

© 2020   Created by Andrew Reinhard.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service