eLatin eGreek eLearn

More wired than a Roman Internet café

Students and teachers of Latin, ancient Greek, and Classical literature can exchange ideas on the role of technology in the Classics classroom here. Share your stories and ideas, Titus-like triumphs, or Trojan-like defeats with colleagues world-wide.

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Anitkythera Shipwreck 4 Replies

Just as much about the archaeological discoveries as it is the advancements:Source: …Continue

Started by Connor Hart. Last reply by Connor Hart Jun 23.

What Was the Venus de Milo Doing With Her Arms?

What Was the Venus de MiloDoing With Her Arms?3-D printing allows us to test a provocative theory that she was busy spinning thread.By Virginia Postrel3-D print of Venus…Continue

Started by Connor Hart May 4.

The Emotion of Hope in Ancient Literature, History and Art

Source: https://www.archaeological.org/events/19089The Emotion of Hope in Ancient Literature, History and ArtFriday, December 11, 2015 to Sunday, December 13, 2015Location:Rethymno GreeceCFP…Continue

Started by Connor Hart Apr 7.

Trajan's Column

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Started by Connor Hart Apr 6.

Blog Posts

SCHOLA has moved

Schola at NING has been closed and I have moved to the Social-Go network, which is based in the UK.

The new website address for Schola is …

Continue

Posted by Molendinarius on August 3, 2014 at 6:39pm

Plotino

Posted by Francesco Cerato on June 2, 2014 at 10:29am

Childrens books in latin

This is a shameless plug for books I translated into Latin. They are all on Worldlibrary in PDF format. If you want a physical book, they are available from Amazon (except Somnium). 

Fabula de Beniamine Lago          Beatrix…

Continue

Posted by William Hanes on August 9, 2013 at 12:03pm

LATINA LINGUA REVIVISCIT - some important articles in english

http://cle.altervista.org

         On the site of "Centrum Latinitatis Europae" of Genoa, at the page "Per i professori" (For…

Continue

Posted by Andrea Del Ponte on July 31, 2013 at 4:18pm

трансфер в Париже

Париж – это столица мечтаний и романтики, столица восторга и колдовства, а также одна из самых дивных европейских столиц. Тут вершилась летопись, и закладываются основы предстоящего. Всякий, кто хоть раз в жизни решился на отдых в Париже, сроду не… Continue

Posted by Isiah Yazzie on March 6, 2013 at 9:58pm

Przecieki maturalne 2013

Przedstawiana witryna zawiera najnowsze przecieki maturalne z tegorocznej matury. Wcześniejsza znajomość testów maturalnych to murowany sukces na egzaminie. Zaprezentowane rozwiązanie sprawy poprawnego… Continue

Posted by Antoine Sands on February 25, 2013 at 9:27am

Centrum Latinitatis Europae now in English!

 

        Hi all, I announce that now it is possible to read in English too (and French, German, Irish, Spanish) the site of classical studies of "Centrum Latinitatis Europae"…

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Posted by Andrea Del Ponte on December 18, 2012 at 9:30am

SKYPE group

Hi,

There is a user compiled list of people interested in speaking Latin via Skype over at Schola.

Feel free to take a look, or add your name to the list.…

Continue

Posted by Molendinarius on August 31, 2012 at 8:00am

Rogue Classicism

ROMAN BRITAIN: A VERY SHORT INTRODUCTION

Originally posted on Classics for All Reviews:
by Peter Salway OUP (2nd edn, 2015) p/b 122pp £7.99 (ISBN 9780198712169) This book is a concise, clear and readable history of Roman Britain across four centuries. It is ideal for the general reader, including one who comes to the subject with no previous knowledge. The book is…

LATE SOPHOCLES: THE HERO’S EVOLUTION IN ELECTRA, PHILOCTETES, AND OEDIPUS AT COLONUS

Originally posted on Classics for All Reviews:
By Thomas Van Nortwick Michigan (2015) h/b 160pp £56.95 (ISBN 9780472119561) Written in Sophocles’ ninth decade (V.N. places Electra close to 410 BC), Electra, Philoctetes and Oedipus at Colonus are far from being the mellow reflections of old age. Instead, they are contentious and innovative, redefining the rules…

OVID: THE OFFENSE OF LOVE Ars Amatoria, Remedia Amoris, and Tristia 2

Originally posted on Classics for All Reviews:
By Julia Dyson Hejduk Wisconsin (2014) p/b 268pp £15.95 (ISBN 9780299302047) H.’s translation with commentary, which is the first to include both the cause of Ovid’s ‘offence’ and his ‘defence’ of his writings, is aimed at readers who have no classical knowledge. As a result, a detailed introduction…

Your Near-Daily Dose of Greek

Νέα διαδικτυακή Κοινότητα Πρακτικής από το Κέντρο Ελληνικής Γλώσσας

Το Κέντρο Ελληνικής Γλώσσας δημιούργησε νέα διαδικτυακή Κοινότητα Πρακτικής, τους Μουσοπόλους (http://www.mousopoloi.gr/). Οι Μουσοπόλοι αποτελούν κλειστή διαδικτυακή Κοινότητα Πρακτικής, αποτελούμενη από διακεκριμένους Ιάπωνες Καθηγητές Κλασικής Φιλολογίας (από τα Πανεπιστήμια Waseda, Nagoya, Tokyo, και Kyoritsu Women's), καθώς και από Ομάδα Ερευνητών του ΚΕΓ. Από την ελληνική πλευρά, συμμετέχουν επιστήμονες, μεταξύ άλλων, οι Καθηγητές Κλασικής Φιλολογίας του Αριστοτέλειου Πανεπιστημίου Θεσσαλονίκης Ι.Ν. Καζάζης, Αντώνιος Ρεγκάκος και Ιωάννης Τζιφόπουλος, Πρόεδρος και Μέλη του Διοικητικού Συμβουλίου του ΚΕΓ αντίστοιχα. Στόχος της πρωτοβουλίας αυτής, η οποία ξεκίνησε από το ΚΕΓ είναι να συντελέσει στην επέκταση των τμημάτων Κλασικής Φιλολογίας, που λειτουργούν ήδη στην Ιαπωνία, από την αρχαία ελληνική στη βυζαντινή και νέα ελληνική γλώσσα, λογοτεχνία και πολιτισμό. Τα μέλη της διαδικτυακής Κοινότητας Πρακτικής θα αναπτύξουν, μεταξύ άλλων, από κοινού ψηφιακά μαθήματα, κατάλληλα για τις ανάγκες των προπτυχιακών φοιτητών στην Ιαπωνία και θα πιστοποιήσουν επισήμως τη γνώση της νέας ελληνικής. Στο πλαίσιο αυτό, το ΚΕΓ θέτει στη διάθεση των μελών της κοινότητας αυτής καθώς και στα συνεργαζόμενα πανεπιστημιακά τμήματα το σύνολο των ψηφιακών πόρων για τη μελέτη της Ελληνικής. Το ψηφιακό αυτό υλικό είναι αποτέλεσμα δεκαπενταετούς έρευνας και θα αποτελέσει τη βάση στην εξ αποστάσεως συνεργασία μεταξύ επιστημόνων και συνεργαζόμενων ερευνητικών φορέων.

Διεθνές Συνέδριο:Time and Space in Greek Myth and Religion (3-6/7/15)

Το "Εργαστήριο Μελέτης Μύθου και Θρησκείας στην Ελληνική και Ρωμαϊκή Αρχαιότητα" του Τμήματος Φιλολογίας του Πανεπιστημίου Πατρών οργανώνει Διεθνές Συνέδριο με θέμα "Time and Space in Greek Myth and Religion", από την Παρασκευή 3 μέχρι τη Δευτέρα 6 Ιουλίου 2015.

Ενημερωτικό δελτίο της Νέας Παιδείας για το μήνα Ιούλιο

Ενημερωτικό δελτίο της Νέας Παιδείας για το μήνα Ιούλιο

Θερινό Σχολείο για νέους ομογενείς (13/7-8/8/15)

Τη Δευτέρα 13 Ιουλίου 2015 και ώρα 20.00 θα πραγματοποιηθεί η τελετή έναρξης του Θερινού Σχολείου για νέους ομογενείς, που οργανώνει η Σχολή Ανθρωπιστικών Επιστημών και Πολιτισμικών Σπουδών του Πανεπιστημίου Πελοποννήσου, σε συνεργασία με την Παμμεσσηνιακή Ομοσπονδία Αμερικής και Καναδά και το Α.Τ.Ε.Ι. Πελοποννήσου από 13 Ιουλίου 2015 έως 8 Αυγούστου 2015. Η τελετή θα γίνει στο Αμφιθέατρο της Σχολής Ανθρωπιστικών Επιστημών και Πολιτισμικών Σπουδών του Πανεπιστημίου Πελοποννήσου στην Καλαμάτα.

Διαπανεπιστημιακό-Διατμηματικό Πρόγραμμα Μεταπτυχιακών Σπουδών: Ρητορική: Θεωρία και Πράξη

Διαπανεπιστημιακό-Διατμηματικό Πρόγραμμα Μεταπτυχιακών Σπουδών "Ρητορική: Θεωρία και Πράξη" Το ΠΤΔΕ της Σχολής Επιστημών του ΕΚΠΑ, σε συνεργασία με το Τμήμα Νηπιαγωγών της Παιδαγωγικής Σχολής του ΠΔΜ, καλούν τους ενδιαφερόμενους να υποβάλουν αίτηση για το ακαδημαϊκό έτος 2015-2016 στις εξής κατευθύνσεις: 1. Ρητορική, Επιστήμες του Ανθρώπου και Εκπαίδευση (τριάντα θέσεις) 2. Ρητορική και Θετικές Επιστήμες (τριάντα θέσεις)

Pompeiiana Newsleter

A Farewell Message from Pompeiiana Newsletter, Then and Now

It is not without some sadness that the Pompeiiana Newsletter blog project comes to a close. I have, for the better part of the past 13 months, posted five issues per week of Dr. Bernard Barcio's labor of love, his Pompeiiana Newsletter, which ran from 1974 until the end of the 2002-2003 school year. It is my hope that Latin teachers, students, and enthusiasts, will continue to return to this
 

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Latinum has moved!

Omnes,

 

Due to the recent struggles with MyPodcast, our own Molendinarius has moved his Latinum site to http://latinum.org.uk.  This change has been reflected in our links section as well.  Please check this out, it's a very useful site.

 

Remember, if you have something that you would like to share with the members here, please send me a message and you can be a "guest" poster.


Pax,

Matthew Paul-Frank Duran
eClassics Administrator

Latest Activity

Katherine Gill is now a member of eLatin eGreek eLearn
Thursday
Esra Derle is now a member of eLatin eGreek eLearn
Wednesday
Marie C. Garza is now a member of eLatin eGreek eLearn
Jun 30
Connor Hart replied to Connor Hart's discussion Anitkythera Shipwreck
"Source: http://www.livescience.com/51302-antikythera-shipwreck-expedition-extended.html Here a researcher examines the anchor of what may be the Antikythera wreck or another wreck nearby. They are uncertain because they used Costeau's…"
Jun 23

BC Latin Blog

Classics in the News, Part 2

Classics in the News, Part II
Bringing Modern Reports of Ancient History into the Classroom

In a recent blog post I touched on a few ways for students to take classics-related news they find online and bring it into the classroom. The idea is to have students briefly browse the internet for or set up an alert to help find an article relevant to classics studies. Then, students share the article with the class, discussing its main points and the significance of the article, as well as its relation to classics. Additionally, I mentioned a couple of different ways to present the article. In light of the March 2015 eLitterae, where Lynne West provides a "Tech Tip" on the movie-making program, Animoto, I will here show how students can use the program for this type of classroom project.
An article taken from the UK news site,
Independent, discusses a botched
restoration  job that ruined mosaics.

The first step is to find the article. As mentioned in the previous post, I receive daily Google alerts, so it was easy to find this article from a United Kingdom news site, the Independent, on a restoration job that left several mosaics warped and ruined. I recommend that part of the project involve students setting up an "ancient news" alert, using terms such as "Ancient," "Greek," and "Roman" to help narrow the results of their alerts.

Next, it is important for students to find out what the main point of the article is, the article's relevance to classics, and why it is significant. Students should not have to force the answers. If they cannot answer these questions easily they should scrap the article and find another as there will be plenty to choose from. In this article, the Independent reports that "negligence in the process of moving the artefacts [sic]" led to the damage of eight or nine mosaics, including one depicting the sacrifice of Isaac and one of Dionysus. This point is at the center of the article. These mosaics are ancient Roman artifacts, directly linking them to the ancient world and thus, making this article relevant to classics. Lastly, the article is important because it raises awareness to the issue of negligence when handling ancient artifacts and how, when not handled properly, valuable pieces can be lost.
A shot of the Animoto dashboard.

Once students have established these points, they should then put it all into presentable format. With Animoto (which, for those interested in trying this approach, allows for a free 30-day trial), all students need to do is pick a video format, add photos and some text, pick some music to accompany the project, and produce it! Students might want to let their film run while they present over it or designate a spot during their presentation to show it to the class. Something simple like this one I've created may work better as an illustrative auxiliary for when the presenter makes their points, though something fancier may deserve more attention.

Students have a chance to let their creative sides shine in a variety of ways! If you have any ideas or suggestions on how else to make "Classics in the News" an effective project, if you you have any experiences using Animoto or any similar format, or if you have other classroom project ideas, comment below! I would love to hear from you.

-Connor Hart

What to Do in Kalamazoo: 50th International Congress on Medieval Studies

What to Do in Kalamazoo: 50th International Congress on Medieval Studies

Laurel Draper and Adam Velez
representing Bolchazy-Carducci
in Kalamazoo, MI in May.
Last month marked the 50th year of the International Congress on Medieval Studies at the Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, Michigan. In attendance for Bolchazy-Carducci were assistant editor Laurel Draper and senior graphic designer Adam VelezCheck out what people bought, said, and won at our booth this year!

Rumor had it that overall attendance for the conference may have been down, but it appeared to be about normal from our end. The Wheelock's Latin supplement, Ecclesiastical, Medieval, and Neo-Latin Sentences, was very popular this year and and attracted many customers seeking help in their transition from elementary Latin to medieval Latin. This supplement moved like hot cakes off of the booth. The usual top sellers, the children’s books and the Dr. Seuss titles, How the Grinch Stole Christmas and The Cat in the Hatwere readily sold as well.

There was also continued strong interest in the BC Latin Readers and LNM. Also, while a few people did come by to look at Artes Latinae, our self-teaching Latin program, most in attendance commented on their expectation of and desire for something more technologically and pedagogically more modern. Looks like we’ll need to make some adjustments to what we bring next year to further suit your interests!
Laurel Draper presenting "fishbowl drawing
winner V. M. Roberts with four new books.

Bolchazy-Carducci also held a “fishbowl” drawing for a bundle of four books, including Ecclesiastical, Medieval, and Neo-Latin Sentences.  When attending conferences, always be sure to stop by our booth, lest you should miss an opportunity to win prizes! Congratulations to V. M. Roberts, the lucky winner of the Kalamazoo "fishbowl" drawing, who took home this book bundle.

Were you able to attend the International Congress on Medieval Studies this year? Do you have questions, or is there anything you hope to see next year? Tell us about your experience in the comments below. I'd love to hear from you!

-Connor Hart

Lectiones Memorabiles, Volume I is at press!

Lectiones Memorabiles, Volume I is at press!

Lectiones Memorabiles: Volume I: Selections from Catullus, Cicero, Livy, Ovid, Propertius, Tibullus, and Vergil, now at press, is due out in June. This reader contains the prescribed passages for the Vergil, Women, and Love Poetry portions of the IB Latin syllabus with examinations in 2016, 2017, and 2018. Order today!

Volume II, which contains the prescribed Good Living and Historypassages, will go to press in a couple weeks and is due out later in June. When Volume II is available, you can save by purchasing both volumes as a bundled product.

Marianthe Colakis, author of Volume I, recently discussed her experiences writing the commentary with eLitterae newsletter editor Don Sprague. The following interview was originally published in the March 2015 issue.

DES: Bolchazy-Carducci chose to divide the IB Latin curriculum for exams in 2016, 2017, and 2018 into two volumes. What inspired you to choose the volume with selections from Vergil and selections on love poetry and on women?

MC: I had taught AP Vergil for years, so I felt as though I knew the text of the Aeneid very well and understood the issues that make the epic more complex than it would appear to be at first glance. As for love poetry, I was fortunate enough as an undergraduate to learn from one of the great experts of Roman poetry: Steele Commager. He was truly brilliant in that he always made you believe that you were seeing the Latin as the Romans saw it. We translated, but the focus was on the arrangement of the Latin words. I also was pursuing higher education in Classics at the same time that women's issues were coming to the forefront as a field of scholarship. I've followed the field with interest since then.


DES: Authoring the background and contextual essays along with the notes for the volume was a significant undertaking. What in your schooling and experience did you find especially prepared you for doing so?

MC: An undergraduate and graduate education in the humanities, including Classics, is excellent preparation for all types of research work and scholarly writing. I'm fortunate in that I like to research. I love working in libraries. The New York Public Library and Butler University Library at Columbia University are superb resources. At the same time, the amount of material available online has grown so much more extensive and dependable that I was able to work away from libraries also. I'm old-fashioned enough to think of brick-and-mortar libraries as my go-to resource, though.

DES: Besides the time crunch, what was the most challenging aspect of this task?

MC: I had not read many of those passages for years, and a few—such as Lygdamus—I had not read at all. I had forgotten how complex some of those authors, such as Propertius, were. I had a new appreciation for what students find difficult when reading the authors for the first time.

DES: What part of the project did you most enjoy?

MC: Although it wasn't always easy to read them, I liked becoming acquainted with authors I had not read much of, or at all, such as the above-mentioned Lygdamus. I liked becoming familiar with Sulpicia, also. We have so little authentic writing by Roman women that it was a pleasure to see something written from a female perspective ("a" female perspective, not "the" female perspective!).

DES: Which of the authors for this text— Catullus, Cicero, Livy, Ovid, Propertius, Tibullus, and Vergil—is your favorite? Why?

MC: I've always been fond of Ovid. He was younger than the other "Golden Age" poets—Vergil, Horace, Propertius, Tibullus—so it was more of a challenge for him to write something fresh, especially in the well-worn field of elegiac love poetry. He did so much more than rehash old tropes, though! It was interesting to read his take on the Odyssey from Penelope's point of view. All her worries—that her husband is dead, that he's found someone else, that they've grown into different people while he was away—ring very true.

DES: What advice do you give someone beginning their career as a high school Latin teacher?

MC: Take as many opportunities as you can to learn from other Latin teachers! If you're the only one at your school, find a way to connect with others online. Go to meetings and workshops, especially ACL institutes. You'll get more ideas than you can use in a year.

Marianthe Colakis has taught at Trinity College (Hartford), Queens College, Brooklyn College, and Davidson College. She is currently teaching at Townsend Harris High School in Queens, New York. Colakis holds a PhD in classics from Yale University. Much of her scholarly work has involved modern adaptations of classical myths and tragedies; her first book was The Classics in the American Theater of the 1960's and Early 1970's (University Press of America, 1993). In recent years, she has turned her efforts toward development of pedagogical materials. Colakis is author (with Gaylan DuBose) of Excelability in Advanced Latin: A Workbook for Students (Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, 2003) and coauthor with Mary Joan Masello of Classical Mythology and More: A Reader Workbook (Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, 2007).

This work has been developed independently from and is not endorsed by the International Baccalaureate (IB).

Classics in the News, Part I

Classics in the News, Part I
Bringing Modern Reports of Ancient History into the Classroom

The eLatin eGreek eLearn homepage.
It might surprise some to learn just how frequently an article pops up discussing the themes of a museum display or the arrival of a new exhibit, or about how an ancient town or statue has been digitized, or about an archaeological find such as the caryatids at Amphipolis or the Antikythera shipwreck. With so much pertinent information circulating, articles could easily slip past a student unnoticed. I set up an alert through Google to keep me updated and have adopted the forum on eLatin eGreek eLearn, the Ning run by Bolchazy-Carducci, as a place to post them. Doing so has sparked an idea for a classroom project.

An image, courtesy of  the Greek Ministry
of Culture, of a caryatid found in a tomb
at Amphipolis.
The project involves a little sleuthing around the internet and drawing some connections, but it should ultimately be a fun learning experience. Students should bring a relevant, interesting, or fun article they find and share it with the class, touching on the main message of the article and where they found it, its significance today, and how it relates to classical studies, giving the project the opportunity to be both enjoyable and educational. Have students sign up or assign them a day throughout the term when they can present their discoveries. Students going earlier may have difficulty digging stuff up, but I have provided plenty on the Ning's forum to serve as a jumping-off point.

Colin Jost, left, and Michael Che
currently host Saturday Night
Live's "Weekend Update." 
The project also provides students the opportunity to get creative with their presentation styles. In an older blog post I mentioned some programs useful in mapping projects. If appropriate for the article, they may also be useful here. For example, students may find Prezi, mentioned in the older post, useful for this type of project, but students have other options, such as a PowerPoint slide show or making a movie with Animoto, or perhaps they would enjoy emulating Saturday Night Live anchors Michael Che and Colin Jost and providing the class with their own classics-related weekend update. There are many ways to get creative, and I urge classrooms to do so.

Stay tuned for my next post where I provide an example of one of the many ways this can be done. In the meantime, if you have any ideas on how else to make this an effective project or if you have other classroom projects, comment below! I would love to hear from you.

-Connor Hart

Lucan Wins: Recap of Martia Dementia

Lucan Wins: Recap of Martia Dementia
The End and Future of Martia Dementia

An image of the final
Marita Dementia bracket
Euclid learned all too well last weekend, which marked the conclusion of the 2015 Martia Dementia, that all good things come to an end. His Cinderella story included a narrow victory over the No. 1 Seed Plato, a marginal triumph over Aristophanes, and pivotal victory over the increasingly popular Xenophon. Some believed that the No. 10 Seed Aeschylus, advancing to the Elite Eight, might stop him, but no, that honor went to Lucan. Lucan, the prolific writer of many titles and epigrams. Lucan, who beat the esteemed Apuleius just a day after upstaging Augustine, and who even pulled out a few tricks from his De bello civili for a victory over the heavily favored Vergil. Lucan beat Euclid 13-2 to take home the glory, thus winning Martia Dementia. Many narratives sprouted from the bracket as voting created conflict between these authors of antiquity, and many surprises came as dark horses produced upset after upset; Hesiod, a four seed, was the highest ranked author to advance past the Elite Eight! These narratives, and the success of Martia Dementia, all happened thanks to our participants.


An image of Marie's
final bracket.
The initial response to Martia Dementia was overwhelming, but thinking that the number of participants would match this was a dream, though it soon became a reality as bracket after bracket began to flood my email. With that, I would like to thank all the teachers, professors, friends, students, and everyone else for their participation. I would also like to take time to acknowledge and congratulate the following for their success in this year's competition. First, to our in-house winner, Marie Bolchazy who, though not in the running for prizes, put up enough points to take second place. Now, to Sabrina Epstein of the Bullis School who, with only three picks remaining after the Round of 32, never gave up hope, I say congratulations for having the most abysmal bracket! To Evelyn Beckman, also of the Bullis School, to whom I am partial for also going with team Ovid, I would like to say congratulations for picking up 48 points and taking third place! To Inna Kunz, whose faith in Lucretius allowed her to just squeak by with a 49-point effort, I would like to say congratulations for finishing in second place! Lastly, I congratulate Thanh Tran who, with 128 points and a near-perfect bracket, won this year's Martia Dementia by a landslide! 

If you were disappointed in how your bracket went this year and wish to prepare for a better outing next time, Tran shared her winning strategy, making it seem easy, saying, "I basically chose the authors whom I liked best in each pairing if not entirely at random." Still, a little more effort and a little outside support helped to make a winning bracket: "I may have asked a lot of my students to vote for my bracket." So there you have it, the winning strategy: a little randomness and a lot of votes.
This Attic red figure vase, found in the University
Museum, University of Pennsylvania, shows Hercules
wrestling with the Nemean lion.

Looking forward to next year's Martia Dementia? Already counting down the days? Want to see a favorite author who did not make this year's cut? Would you rather see gods and goddesses versus heroes versus beasts? Perhaps you prefer political bouts? Tweet @BCPublishers what and who you would like to see, and include the hash tag #MartiaDementia or give feedback in the comments below. Did you have questions or comments about how this year's competition went? Were you able to find ways to incorporate Martia Dementia into the classroom, or do you have ideas of how you might next year? Comment below; I would love to hear from you!

-Connor Hart
 
 
 

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Links you can Use

Here are some helpful, pedagogical links for Classicists:

Lydia Fassett teaches high school Latin and gave a great presentation on Latin and classroom technology at the 2010 Classical Association of New England annual meeting. Take a look at all of the contemporary resources she used here.

Dr. Rick LaFleur, eClassics member and University of Georgia professor, leads a Latin teaching methods class online. This semester's methods class is up & running, with a dozen or so students enrolled from across the U.S. For info, interested persons should go here. Surf around, and especially click on OVERVIEW in the middle of the home page.

Patron saint of oral Latin, Dr. Terry Tunberg of the University of Kentucky, offers this link to videos of impromptu conversational Latin, with accents placed with 100% accuracy.

The Association for Latin Teaching (ArLT) in the UK publishes a lively blog which you can read here.

The American Philological Association (APA) sponsored its first-ever podcasting panel in 2009. Listen to the podcasts and leave feedback by clicking here.

eClassics member Evan Millner is prolific in the UK with a number of fun and practical Latin-language websites:

1) Schola is an all-Latin language, informal social network. Do visit Schola and participate!

2) Latinum is an extensive site containing hundreds of lessons in spoken Classical Latin, based on a free pdf textbook. In addition, Latinum provides vocabulary drills, and a wide range of Classical and other readings. Over one million audio downloads in its first year, and steadily growing in popularity. Visit the site by clicking here!

3) Imaginum Vocabularium is an image-based site to help with vocabulary learning. Visit this unique and helpful site here.

Scholiastae , a new wiki, is intended as a way for people to share their own scholia on classical works. Thanks to William Annis for this new site.

French Latinists unite! See what's happening with oral Latin in France by clicking here.

eClassics member Danja Mahoney (aka Magistra M), blogs about teaching Latin in the 21st century and focuses on technology and teaching. Visit her blog here, or read it via the RSS feed on the left.

Perlingua.com is a great free resource for Latin teachers containing games, PowerPoint slideshows, audio, video, and more, for a variety of Latin textbooks.

Check out eClassics member, M. Fletcher's, Facebook group, "Latin & Greek: Listen and Learn".

AKWN.NET: From Dr. Juan Coderch at the University of St. Andrews comes the news of the world in ancient Greek! Click here to read.

Latinitas Viva!: eClassics member Stefano runs a Latin-languages website and blog which is really worth spending some time exploring. Click here to get there.

The Vatican's Latin-language version of its website is now live. Check it out here.

One goal of many Classics students is to gain an advanced degree in philology and/or archaeology. To that end, the good people over at the Classical Journal have provided a comprehensive list of graduate study programs both in North America and abroad. They have also published on-line a comprehensive guide on how and where to present scholarly papers at conferences. Both of these outstanding resources can be found by clicking here.

The Classical Journal, published by CAMWS (the Forum section is dedicated to pedagogy).

An article on technology and Classics pedagogy, "From Slate to Tablet PC: Using New Technologies to Teach and Learn Latin and Greek", has been published as an on-line exclusive to the Classical Journal (CAMWS). Written by eClassics founder and Director of eLearning for Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, Andrew Reinhard, the article covers a wide spectrum of digital tools for the contemporary Classicist to use in (and out) of the classroom. The article has been peer-reviewed and edited and appears as part of the CJ Forum which is dedicated to Classics pedagogy.

Speaking of the Classical Association of the Middle West and South (CAMWS), do pay a visit to their page for the Committee for the Promotion of Latin for helpful links to "emergency kits for programs in crisis", funding opportunities, and CPL Online, a "national peer-reviewed journal on all facets of Latin teaching at all levels...".

Excellence Through Classics is a standing committee of the American Classical League for the promotion and support of Elementary, Middle School &
Introductory Classics Programs.

The Iris Project (and Iris magazine) is a UK-based initiative to promote Classics to anyone and everyone. From their homepage: "This magazine is part of a wider initiative, the iris project, which was founded in the belief that the opportunity to learn about the fascinating languages, literature, histories and art of the Ancient World should be made available to all, regardless of background. This initiative seeks to awaken and nurture an interest in the Classics by making it accessible and appealing to a broad audience." This is a great program -- please visit!

For Latin teachers and students who wish to test their conversational mettle with other Latin speakers worldwide, click here to join a UK-based group that regularly speaks using Skype, an on-line phone service.

All Vergil all the time at virgilius.org! Links to Vergil teacher pages, quote of the day, and more.

The American School of Classical Studies' Blegen Library has a blog managed by eClassics member Chuck Jones. See what's new at the library by clicking here.

N. S. Gill has a handy blog on Classics and ancient history on about.com, updated several times a day.

A clearinghouse of articles on ancient history, along with images of inscriptions, art, and archaeology, covering the whole of Mediterranean civilization can be found at Livius.org.

Speaking of blogging, there is a Roman cooking blog here by a student at Evergreen State College (Olympia, Washington).

For a revolutionary take on Latin reading and comprehension, take a look at Paul Latimer O'Brien's site, Visual Latin.

One of our members, Manolis Tzortzis, worked as a researcher at the Center for Greek Language. See what's new here (and via the RSS feed on the left).

Greek-Language.com
is a one-stop resource for grammars and other learning materials for varying levels of students of Classical and Koine Greek.

Looking for Latin primary texts already on-line (without having to go to Perseus)? Try this metasite hosted by Georgetown University for both Classical and Medieval Latin. Georgetown also has a bonanza of links to Latin manuscripts, too, for those folks interested in paleography as a pedagogical tool.

Dr. Cora Sowa has created a project planning toolkit for literary scholars (and specific tools for completing specific tasks including cluster analysis). Find out more about the Loom of Minerva by clicking here.

A vulgate Latin blog with podcasts can be accessed here. Scottus Barbarus (J. Scott Olsson) has made this resource available to all -- quite worth a listen!

From Lithuania comes Carmina Latina, two MP3 tracks from Catullus and Flaccus, beautifully arranged and voiced by Julija Butkevičiūtė, singer and Latin student.

OK, here's yet another Latin podcast link to Haverford College which has a clearinghouse of Latin podcast links. The link to links.

Dr. Laura Gibbs out of the University of Oklahoma regularly blogs on Latin pedagogy on her site, Bestiaria Latina. Check out the list of Latin books for children, Latin puzzles (sudoku, anyone?), and more! Laura also has two other cool sites for anyone interested in fun ways to learn Latin: Latin crossword puzzles and Latin via fables.

Got podcasts? Dr. Chris Francese does. As an Associate Professor of Classical Languages at Dickinson College, he produces high-quality Latin poetry podcasts with regularity. Listen here. Scroll to the bottom of his blog to subscribe via iTunes.

Dr. Francese has also been experimenting with the idea of presenting Latin texts with translation and/or commentary in wiki format. The sample in the link below is the little dialogue about going to school from Colloquia Monacensia. The link is: http://wiki.dickinson.edu/index.php?title=Colloquia_Monacensia

Rogue Classicism, posted by David Meadows , is probably the most complete resource for up-to-the-second media coverage of all things Classical, plus regular features like "Words of the Day" and "This Day in Ancient History".

Electronic Resources for Classicists, a meta-site.

Of special interest to “wired” Classicists, the daily blog on stoa.org is an invaluable source of news, calls for papers, and interesting projects all involving technology and the Classics.

eClassics member Pieter Jansegers administers this link farm for Latinists from Belgium. That is to say, he's from Belgium. Any Latinist can use his links!

Rob Latousek is the president of Centaur Systems software, a company he founded in 1984. His company produces Classics-themed software ranging from dictionaries to tours of archaeological sites.

Julian Morgan could be considered to by Rob Latousek's UK counterpart, and has been involved in connecting the two worlds of Classics and ICT for years. Visit his site, and read his article (in PDF) on "A Good Practice Guide for the use of ICT in Classics Teaching".

The Digital Classicist discussion list covers everything from picking a professional-grade image scanner to calls for papers, managed from King’s College, London.

My publisher, Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, Inc., has a variety of forums discussing everything from Gilgamesh to Uses and Abuses of the Classics. Join the discussion by clicking here.

Rose Williams has been teaching Latin "for a very long time" (her words) to anyone who will listen. You can benefit from her experience by downloading the numerous PDF handouts she has posted on her new web site, roserwilliams.com.

Humanist is an international electronic seminar on humanities computing and the digital humanities. Its primary aim is to provide a forum for discussion of intellectual, scholarly, pedagogical, and social issues for exchange of information among members. It is an affiliated publication of the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS).

iPodius
is a digital download store for Latin and Greek audio, video, and software, managed by Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers.



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