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More wired than a Roman Internet café

Bill Parsons
  • 51, Male
  • Lowell
  • United States
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K. Christian McGuire and Bill Parsons are now friends
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Profile Information

Hometown/Institution:
Franklin Pierce University
Role in the Classics Classroom (real or virtual):
all of the above
About Me:
During the day, I am teach Engineering Tech and Exploratory Latin at a middle school near Worcester, MA. At night I teach history at Franklin Pierce University. I am also working on a translation of Horace's Epodes.
My Website:
http://www.billblogx.blogspot.com
Favorite on-line spots for the Classics:
Rogueclassicism, Blogographos, Laudator Temporis Acti
Favorite on-line spots for education:
Depends on what I am doing at the moment.
Best/worst computer-related classroom happening:
I took a 100% online class when I was getting my MEd (it seems proper, even after so many years, not to name the institution) which was awful. I decided I could do better and it turns out I was right. I am now teaching almost exclusively in the 100% online envirnment at Fraknlin Pierce University, developing online classes and pedagogy, and training.

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Bill Parsons's Blog

Epode 10

Horace

Epode 10





The ship, loosed from its moorings, sets off under a bad omen, carrying that stinker Maevius. South Wind—may you remember to beat both sides of the ship with terrible waves; Black East Wind—scatter rigging and broken oars across the swirling sea; North Wind—rise up as powerfully as when you shatter great oaks on high mountains. May no friendly star appear in the black night where sad Orion sets. May he be carried on no quieter or more even sea than the… Continue

Posted on November 20, 2008 at 4:00am

Epode 9- Squeamish Allowed

Blessed Maecenas, when will I, happy, by the grace of Jove, drink vintage Caecuban at the victory banquet with you, in your great house with victorious Caesar, the lyre playing a Dorian march with barbarian flutes mixed in? Just as we recently celebrated, when the retreating Neptunian leader, threatening chains on the city which he dragged from his friends-- perfidious slaves-- flew through the straits, his ships in flames.



A Roman—God! (future generations will deny it)—made over to… Continue

Posted on September 22, 2008 at 4:28am

Epode 8- not for the squeamish

Time to start in with my Horace translations again. Epode 8 is definately not for those easily offended.











Epode 8

Horace

Tr. William Parsons





You ask me, you pig, over and over again, what wilts my manhood, while you are the one with the one black tooth, with old age plowing your brow with wrinkles, and your filthy asshole, with shit still on it, gaping between boney ass cheeks like some cow's! But what really gets me is your… Continue

Posted on September 14, 2008 at 6:30pm

Julius Caesar

Julius Caesar has been making a comeback in the last decade. Michael Parenti’s The Assassination of Julius Caesar and Adrian Goldsworthy’s Caesar; Life of a Colossus are just two of the recent treatments of this larger than life figure, almost legendary in his own day, mythic in ours. Philip Freeman’s stated purpose was to parse out the myths from the facts and his Julius Caesar is a brilliant and compelling narrative which will help the general reader realize just how… Continue

Posted on August 11, 2008 at 9:50am

Epode 7

Why, why have all of you hastened towards infamy? And why have unsheathed swords been fitted into your hands? Has not enough Latin blood poured upon the field and sea, not so the Roman might burn the proud citadels of envious Carthage, or send unconquered Britain down the Sacred Way in chains, but in answer to the prayers of the Parthians, that this city might kill itself with its own right hand?



Wolves and lions do not exhibit this behavior, except upon other animals, wild though… Continue

Posted on June 15, 2008 at 11:47am

Comment Wall (4 comments)

At 10:31pm on December 18, 2007, Laura Gibbs said…
Hi Bill! I've been teaching online since 2002 and would not go back in the classroom even if the chance came up - I love teaching online! Unfortunately, my school's Classics department is very hostile to the whole thing so I am not teaching Latin/Greek (I created courses for Medieval Latin and Biblical Greek and managed to sneakily teach them for one semester through other departments before Classics found out!) - but I teach online mythology, folklore, etc. and love it - my emphasis is on finding ways for the students to publish their work online, interact with each other - as a result, the classes are so much more "human" than anything I was ever able to manage in the classroom, where there just wasn't enough time for everybody to express themselves! I keep all my course materials here:
MythFolklore.net
Best wishes in your audio projects!!!
:-)
At 3:52am on December 19, 2007, Bill Parsons said…
I love the online environment, but I have to say I miss the live studio audience. I'll be teaching the Iliad for the first time online in January and I am a bit nerrvous; my students have traditionally been verrry intimidated by it and it will be interesting i what I write will do the same job as what I lecture.
At 8:04am on December 19, 2007, Raphaela said…
Hi Bill! I just saw your comment on my blog entry and replied to it. Not sure how the notification system works and whether you'll be alerted automatically! The comment is here.
At 7:22pm on September 14, 2008, RJ said…
Hello Bill Parsons, this is RJ Parsons in Long Beach, CA. I enjoyed reading your translation of Horace's Epode 8. It's a good thing that Parsonses aren't too squeamish. Bene vale!

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