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More wired than a Roman Internet café

Students and teachers of Latin, ancient Greek, and Classical literature can exchange ideas on the role of technology in the Classics classroom here. Share your stories and ideas, Titus-like triumphs, or Trojan-like defeats with colleagues world-wide.

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Nutting's 'Ad Alpes' Latin Audiobook

Ad Alpes: a Tale of Roman Life is a  Latin reader for intermediate students.It was originally published in 1923. The story is held together by the narrative conceit of a journey from Ephesus in Asia Minor, where the father, Publius Cornelius, had…Continue

Started by Latinum Institute Jul 2, 2020.

The Vulgate Psalms in Classical Audio

https://www.patreon.com/latinumNew at Latinum: the Vulgate Psalms in classical audio are now complete. I have also started working on recording versions of…Continue

Started by Latinum Institute Jul 18, 2017.

Hey Archaeologists: Caryatids at Amphipolis (More Links at Bottom) 10 Replies

Figurines From Ancient Greek Tomb Called Major DiscoveryArchaeologists inspect a female figurine in a hall leading to an unexplored main room of an ancient tomb, in the town of Amphipolis, northern Greece, released by the Greek Culture Ministry,…Continue

Started by Connor Hart. Last reply by Connor Hart Oct 2, 2015.

Blog Posts

Latinum Institute Website Update

The Latinum Institutehas rebuilt its website, making it far easier for students to find the materials in our ever growing catalogue.…

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Posted by Latinum Institute on July 2, 2020 at 12:04pm

How To Cultivate An Indoor Organic Garden

It is assumed that those who consider buying their groceries on the web are lazy certainly not wish to go out of the house, away from their computer. This is often a misguided notion. Online food delivery is really a boon for the running class…

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Posted by Charlie Griffiths on March 12, 2018 at 10:49am

The Vulgate Psalms in Classical Audio

https://www.patreon.com/latinum

New at Latinum: the Vulgate Psalms in classical audio are now complete. I have also started working on recording…

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Posted by Latinum Institute on July 18, 2017 at 1:55pm

Rachel Bilson Nude. Rachel Bilson Upskirt









Rachel Bilson nude,Rachel Bilson fakes,nude Rachel Bilson…







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Posted by John Martin on May 22, 2017 at 5:54am

Latinum is now on Patreon

The internet keeps mutating, and Classical life online needs to change as well. Latinum is now on Patreon.

The Latinum Podcast, which used to be hosted on mypodcast.com, has…

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Posted by Latinum Institute on April 22, 2017 at 6:17pm

spoken latin

hi eclassics

i am a latin learner (11 years)i would like to speak the language a bit more.i find adler interesting but difficult to manage on your own.i have been working through orberg (lingua latina) for the last 8 years, ideally i would…

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Posted by dan lane on November 13, 2016 at 3:55pm

De Schola apud SKYPE

Salvete et Vos Consodales,
Si per SKYPEN (Skype) confabulari vis, habemus LOCUTORIUM LATINUM apud Skype, et possis illic confabulari per litteras, picturas…
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Posted by Latinum Institute on January 8, 2016 at 5:46pm

Parsed Interlinear Vulgate

Posted by John Jackson on September 27, 2015 at 12:00am

Schola

As the internet has changed markedly since I first opened Schola on NIng, and again on social-go, after Ning hiked their prices to make continuing unviable, I have decided the time has come to close Schola down - people now have whatsapp groups…

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Posted by Latinum Institute on August 25, 2015 at 4:39pm

Rogue Classicism

This is a test post

Having recovered from a stroke in October, I’m hoping to resume blogging if possible

Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for October 30, 2023

Hodie est a.d. III Kal. Nov. 2776 AUC ~ 16 Pyanepsion in the third year of the 700th Olympiad In the News Depiction of Trojan War hero Ajax found in 1,800-year-old submerged building in Greece | Live Science Cristiano Ronaldo, Lionel Messi and Kylian Mbappe move over! Meet the Roman athlete who’s ‘£15BILLION fortune’ eclipses … Continue reading Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for October 30, 2023

Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for October 28, 2023

Hodie est a.d. V Kal. Nov. 2776 AUC ~ 14 Pyanepsion in the third year of the 700th Olympiad In the News Cicero cleared at Supreme Court of murdering five opponents in 2,086 year old case Depiction of Trojan War hero Ajax found in 1,800-year-old submerged building in Greece | Live Science In Case You … Continue reading Thelxinoe ~ Classics News for October 28, 2023

Your Near-Daily Dose of Greek

''Τα βιβλία αλλάζουν χέρια και χαιρόμαστε!'', Εκδήλωση στη Δημοτική Βιβλιοθήκη Χανίων (22/7/2024)

Εκατοντάδες βιβλία θα χαρίσει η Δημοτική Βιβλιοθήκη Χανίων κατά τη διάρκεια εκδήλωσης με τίτλο: ''Τα βιβλία αλλάζουν χέρια και χαιρόμαστε!'', τη Δευτέρα 22 Ιουλίου 2024 και ώρα 3μ.μ. έως 9μ.μ. στο χώρο του αναγνωστηρίου της Βιβλιοθήκης. (Υψηλαντών 30) Η Δημοτική Βιβλιοθήκη Χανίων δέχεται καθημερινά δωρεές βιβλίων ποικίλου περιεχομένου από συμπολίτες μας. Τα πολλαπλά αντίτυπα δωρίζονται σε άλλες βιβλιοθήκες του Νομού μας, σε Σχολικές Βιβλιοθήκες και στις Ανταλλακτικές Βιβλιοθήκες. Φέτος, διοργανώνεται δεύτερη φορά, η προσφορά στο αναγνωστικό κοινό, εκατοντάδων τίτλων βιβλίων από τα πολλαπλά αντίτυπα δωρεών! Σας περιμένουμε να διαλέξετε αυτά που επιθυμείτε!

Έκθεση βιβλίου στο Ναύπλιο (26/7-18/8/2024)

Από την Παρασκευή 26 Ιουλίου έως και την Κυριακή 18 Αυγούστου 2024, θα πραγματοποιηθεί στο Ναύπλιο η καθιερωμένη έκθεση Βιβλίου, στην πλατεία Ωνάση, καθημερινά, 19.00 - 24.00. Μια έκθεση θεσμός και μια πρόκληση για τους μικρούς και μεγάλους φίλους του βιβλίου, να ενημερωθούν για την ελληνική και παγκόσμια βιβλιογραφία στη σκιά του Παλαμιδιού. Στην έκθεση παίρνουν μέρος πάνω από 80 εκδότες με τις πιο πρόσφατες εκδόσεις τους και διαχρονικούς τίτλους, ο σύλλογος ατόμων με αναπηρία Ν. Αργολίδας, η Μητρόπολη Αργολίδας και η Ένωσης Συγγραφέων και Λογοτεχνών Αργολίδας. Στο περίπτερο της ΠΟΕΒ φιλοξενούνται βιβλία των μελών της Ένωσης Συγγραφέων και Λογοτεχνών Αργολίδας, και κάθε συγγραφέα που ζει ή γεννήθηκε στην Αργολίδα όπως επίσης και βιβλία που αναφέρονται στο Ναύπλιο

Κύκλος εκδηλώσεων με τίτλο: ''Κάθε Τετάρτη στο Εϋνάρδειο με ένα βιβλίo'' από την Καποδιστριακή Δημόσια Βιβλιοθήκη της Αίγινας (31/7-28/8/2024)

Για τέταρτη χρονιά φέτος, η Καποδιστριακή Δημόσια Βιβλιοθήκη της Αίγινας διοργανώνει τον κύκλο εκδηλώσεων με τίτλο: ''Κάθε Τετάρτη στο Εϋνάρδειο με ένα βιβλίο'', τις Τετάρτες από 31 Ιουλίου έως 28 Αυγούστου 2024, στις 9 το βράδυ. Πρόκειται για έναν κύκλο με φανατικούς φίλους, που έχει γίνει πια θεσμός του αιγινήτικου καλοκαιριού στον μαγευτικό κήπο του Εϋναρδείου, Μητροπόλεως 10 στην Αίγινα. Φέτος, οι Τετάρτες της Καποδιστριακής Βιβλιοθήκης επικεντρώνονται σε ένα θέμα που έχει αποδειχθεί πολύ δημοφιλές τα προηγούμενα χρόνια: στην ανίχνευση του παρελθόντος, όπως ζωντανεύει μέσα από τα βιβλία, κι έχει τίτλο: ''Το παρελθόν ζωντανεύει μέσα από άγνωστα αρχεία'',

Έναρξη εγγραφών στο Πρόγραμμα «Διαδρομές στη διδασκαλία της ελληνικής ως δεύτερης/ξένης γλώσσας» για διδάσκοντες στην Ελλάδα και το εξωτερικό

Το Κέντρο Ελληνικής Γλώσσας ανακοινώνει τη νέα περίοδο του εξ αποστάσεως επιμορφωτικού προγράμματος «Διαδρομές στη διδασκαλία της ελληνικής ως δεύτερης/ξένης Γλώσσας» για διδάσκοντες/ουσες στην Ελλάδα και το εξωτερικό (http://diadromes.greek-language.gr). Τα μαθήματα ξεκινούν τη Δευτέρα 9 Σεπτεμβρίου 2024 και διαρκούν 9 μήνες. Αιτήσεις εγγραφής γίνονται δεκτές από 23/04/2024 μέχρι και 05/09/2024 στην ηλεκτρονική διεύθυνση www.greek-language.gr/routes. Το πρόγραμμα αποτελείται από τις παρακάτω οκτώ ενότητες, οι οποίες καλύπτουν όλες τις θεματικές περιοχές που ενδιαφέρουν τον/τη διδάσκοντα/ουσα την ελληνική ως δεύτερη/ξένη γλώσσα: 1. Σχεδιασμός και διαχείριση μαθήματος, διδασκαλία των τεσσάρων δεξιοτήτων 2. Διδασκαλία της γραμματικής, του λεξιλογίου και της προφοράς 3. Διδασκαλία ξένης γλώσσας μέσω Η/Υ (Computer Assisted Language Learning) 4. Γλωσσική διδασκαλία σε παιδιά 5. Όψεις της γλώσσας (Ποικιλομορφία της γλώσσας, κειμενικά είδη και λογοτεχνικός λόγος) 6. Διγλωσσία: Η γλώσσα και η σκέψη στον δίγλωσσο ομιλητή 7. Όταν οι πολιτισμοί συνομιλούν στο σχολείο: ζητήματα διαπολιτισμικής εκπαίδευσης 8. Αξιολόγηση της επίδοσης των μαθητών Το πρόγραμμα, που από την πρώτη χρονιά εφαρμογής του, το 2007, τιμήθηκε με το Ευρωπαϊκό Σήμα Γλωσσών, διαρκώς επικαιροποιείται και βελτιώνεται, ενώ προσφέρει ευελιξία στην παρακολούθησή του, καθώς υλοποιείται εξ ολοκλήρου από απόσταση με ασύγχρονη διδασκαλία. Οι επιμορφούμενοι/ες σε κάθε ενότητα έχουν πρόσβαση επί 24ώρου βάσεως στο υλικό και σε φόρα συζητήσεων για άμεση επικοινωνία με τους/τις διδάσκοντες/διδάσκουσες καθώς και τους/τις επιμορφούμενους/επιμορφούμενες, προκειμένου να υπάρχει ανταλλαγή απόψεων και εποικοδομητικός διάλογος. Πραγματοποιούνται 2 τηλεσεμινάρια σε κάθε ενότητα, σε πραγματικό χρόνο, για τη ζωντανή επικοινωνία με την ομάδα διδασκαλίας. Μοναδικά στοιχεία του προγράμματος: - Τρεις, τουλάχιστον, εξειδικευμένοι/ες διδάσκοντες/ουσες σε κάθε ενότητα, με πολύχρονη πείρα στον τομέα τους, διδάσκουν, επιβλέπουν και απαντούν άμεσα στις ερωτήσεις των επιμορφούμενων. - Η διδασκαλία αξιοποιεί αρχές της εξ αποστάσεως εκπαίδευσης. - Οι επιμορφούμενοι/ες εκπονούν εργασία σε κάθε ενότητα με την καθοδήγηση και υποστήριξη των διδασκόντων/διδασκουσών. - Από το 2022–2023 λειτουργεί διαδικτυακή κοινότητα εκπαιδευτικών στην οποία εντάσσονται οι απόφοιτοι/ες. Η καινοτομία αυτή ανταποκρίνεται στις σύγχρονες επιστημονικές αναζητήσεις, οι οποίες δεν θεωρούν την εκπαίδευση εκπαιδευτικών ως μια άπαξ ενέργεια που ολοκληρώνεται με τον κύκλο κάποιων μαθημάτων. Το περιβάλλον της διαδικτυακής κοινότητας ανταποκρίνεται στην ανάγκη αυτή, παρέχοντας τη δυνατότητα για συνεχή συνεργασία και ενημέρωση στο μέλλον. Στο πρόγραμμα μπορεί να συμμετέχει κάθε εμπλεκόμενος/η στη ή/και ενδιαφερόμενος/η για τη διδασκαλία της ελληνικής ως δεύτερης/ξένης γλώσσας στην Ελλάδα και στο εξωτερικό, αρκεί να είναι απόφοιτος/η ελληνικής φιλολογίας, ξένων φιλολογιών, παιδαγωγικών τμημάτων, θεολογικών σχολών ή άλλων πανεπιστημιακών τμημάτων ελληνικών ή ισότιμων ξένων πανεπιστημίων. Υπό όρους γίνονται δεκτοί/ές υποψήφιοι/ες που δεν έχουν ολοκληρώσει σπουδές τριτοβάθμιας εκπαίδευσης. Το Πρόγραμμα «Διαδρομές στη διδασκαλία της νέας ελληνικής ως δεύτερης/ξένης γλώσσας» α) αποτελεί αναγνωρισμένο επιμορφωτικό πρόγραμμα από το Υπουργείο Παιδείας και Θρησκευμάτων και οδηγεί στην απόκτηση αναγνωρισμένης από το ελληνικό κράτος διδακτικής επάρκειας για τη διδασκαλία της ελληνικής στην αλλοδαπή (Υ.Α. Φ.815.2/306/40937/Ζ1, ΦΕΚ τ. Β΄ 862/8.4.2014), β) παρέχει πιστοποιημένη εξειδίκευση στη διδασκαλία της ελληνικής ως δεύτερης/ξένης γλώσσας και ανταποκρίνεται στα συνεκτιμώμενα προσόντα της πρόσφατης ρύθμισης για τη στελέχωση των Δομών Υποδοχής για την Εκπαίδευση των Προσφύγων (ΔΥΕΠ) από μόνιμους εκπαιδευτικούς, σύμφωνα με το άρθρο 8 παρ. 3 (δ) της Κ.Υ.Α. αριθμ. 152360/ΓΔ4/19.9.2016 (ΦΕΚ 3049/Β/23.9.2016), γ) μοριοδοτείται ως προσόν για την επιλογή των στελεχών της εκπαίδευσης (νόμος υπ’ αριθμ. 4823/2021. ΦΕΚ 136/Α/3-8-2021). Για κάθε σχετική πληροφορία, όπως την εγγραφή στο πρόγραμμα και το κόστος, σας παραπέμπουμε στην ιστοσελίδα των εγγραφών: www.greek-language.gr/routes. Στοιχεία επικοινωνίας: Συντονίστριες του προγράμματος «Διαδρομές» : Αθανασία Μαργώνη, Ευδοξία Μητρούση Ηλεκτρονικό ταχυδρομείο : diadromes@greeklanguage.gr Skype : Διαδρομές - Routes Τηλ. : (0030) 2310 805 507 & 488 560 (ώρες πληροφόρησης: 9.00-15.00 καθημερινά-εργάσιμες ημέρες) Δείτε στα συνημμένα το Δελτίο Τύπου στα ελληνικά, αγγλικά, γερμανικά και ρωσικά

Pompeiiana Newsleter

A Farewell Message from Pompeiiana Newsletter, Then and Now

It is not without some sadness that the Pompeiiana Newsletter blog project comes to a close. I have, for the better part of the past 13 months, posted five issues per week of Dr. Bernard Barcio's labor of love, his Pompeiiana Newsletter, which ran from 1974 until the end of the 2002-2003 school year. It is my hope that Latin teachers, students, and enthusiasts, will continue to return to this
 

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Latinum has moved!

Omnes,

 

Due to the recent struggles with MyPodcast, our own Molendinarius has moved his Latinum site to http://latinum.org.uk.  This change has been reflected in our links section as well.  Please check this out, it's a very useful site.

 

Remember, if you have something that you would like to share with the members here, please send me a message and you can be a "guest" poster.


Pax,

Matthew Paul-Frank Duran
eClassics Administrator

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Marcelo Bazanelli updated their profile
Aug 31, 2021
Latinum Institute and Jonathan DeSousa are now friends
Jul 3, 2020
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Nutting's 'Ad Alpes' Latin Audiobook

Ad Alpes: a Tale of Roman Life is a  Latin reader for intermediate students.It was originally published in 1923. The story is held together by the narrative conceit of a journey from Ephesus in Asia Minor, where the father, Publius Cornelius, had been serving as a government official, back to Italy and then overland to the Alps.On the way, the family travel via Brundisium (Brindisi), visit Rome briefly, and then travel on towards the Alps. During the journey, Cornelius, his wife Drusilla, sons Publius and Sextus,  daughter Cornelia and a Greek slave Onesimus and servant/slave  Stasimus (who is impudent, and is always is getting into scrapes) tell each other stories. The family also own a Jewish slave, Anna, who is the wet nurse for their infant son, Lucius. She from time to time relates stories from the Bible.The text of the 1927 edition can be read on-line on the…See More
Jul 2, 2020
Latinum Institute posted photos
Jul 2, 2020

BC Latin Blog

Martia Dementia 2024


Bolchazy-Carducci is now completing its first DECADE of Martia Dementia contests. All sorts of ancient figures, from authors and emperors to gods, monsters, and even birds have entered our gladiatorial arena. Now, monuments of the Mediterranean (and a few farther flung places) are about to strive for a place as Martia Dementia champions! The returning competitors: the non-Olympian deities that battled mightily in 2023, only to succumb to triple-headed Cerberus!

To the victor—whoever finishes with the best bracket—belong the spoils. Before getting to the prizes, here is how the competition will work. Please read through the process carefully. For reference, we are providing a PDF of the bracket that you can use with your classes, but be sure to submit your final choices via the online system.

The Bracket

Starting today, complete and submit a bracket to be eligible for wondrous prizes. Please access and submit your bracket online via the following link: Martia Dementia 2024 Bracket

When you access the online Martia Dementia bracket, click the “Submit your bracket!” button to start making your selections. You will be prompted to enter your name and email address; we need this information so that we can track and notify the winners of the competition once Martia Dementia is completed. After signing up, you will be asked to predict a winner for each game in the bracket. 


At the bottom of this post, you will find a link to a PDF showing short descriptions of each of this year’s
Martia Dementia participants. You can access the same descriptions by clicking on the photo of a given figure in the bracket.


Once you have completed all of your selections and have submitted your bracket, you will receive a notice thanking you for your submission.

If you would like to view your prediction bracket, simply click on the link to “View My Prediction.” We recommend saving a copy of your bracket at this point so that you can keep track of how you are doing as the competition progresses. With our online submission system, you can also easily share your prediction bracket via email or social media—a great way to show off how you’re doing, or earn some pity points if your bracket is going poorly. 

We are also providing a PDF copy of the bracket here (for reference only) in case you would like to print a copy of the bracket and fill one in with your class. However, we are not accepting scanned brackets, so make sure that you also submit the bracket online.

Brackets will be accepted through Wednesday, March 20.

The Survey

A voting survey will be made available on Thursday, March 21, where you can vote for your picks. Whichever figures have the most votes by the time the survey closes will advance through the round. Actively participating in the survey betters your chances at winning. We will announce via social media when voting for each round has opened.

We cannot stress enough the importance of voting. When the survey goes live, cast your votes! Get your friends to vote for your picks. Teachers, get your students to stuff the survey with favorable votes!

Victori Spolia

This competition is not solely for bringing glory to your favorite ancient writer or bird. Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers is offering book prizes for the brackets that most closely resemble the final results; a $100 book credit will be awarded to the first-place participant, a $50 credit to the second-place participant, and a $25 credit to the third-place participant. Feeling like you no longer stand a chance? Do not give up! There will also be a $25 credit for having the most abysmal bracket! 

Stay Connected

Be sure to bookmark this post for future reference. Also, follow us on Facebook for updates as the competition progresses.

Remember, brackets close March 20, and the first round of voting will begin March 21.     

Bracket and Other Resources

Voting Schedule

  • Round 1: March 21–22
  • Round 2: March 23–26
  • Round 3 (Sweet 16): March 28–29
  • Quarterfinals (Elite 8): March 30–April 2
  • Semifinals (Final 4): April 3–5
  • Final (Championship): April 6–9
Note that each round of voting will open at 7:30 a.m. central time and close at 4:00 p.m. central time on the designated days.  

Cerberus Wins: Martia Dementia 2023 Recap



Martia Dementia 2023 brought back some popular players—mythical monsters—to face off against an array of ancient deities. Medusa, Medea’s dragons, and many more steeled themselves to fight the likes of Sterquilinus (Roman god of dung!), triple-bodied Hecate, and esoteric Etruscan god of the underworld, Lur. Among the divine challengers, a few emerged as early fan favorites. Sol Invictus, said to be “unconquered,” trounced the competitive field until succumbing to the goddess of victory herself, Nike. Hypnos and Thanatos, working as a pair, put in a good showing as well. Meanwhile, monsters dominated from the beginning: from the giant automaton Talos to the hundred-handed Hecatoncheires, these creatures proved their mettle.


Magistra Farkas's winning class.
In the end, the literal underdog of the competition—Cerberus, three-headed canine resident of the underworld—reigned victorious. Beating out several gods (Flora, Veiovis, Asclepius), Cerberus defeated mother of monsters Echidna before handily dispensing with Nike, a true upset. In the finals, Cerberus finished off Talos to run away with the championship win.

Thank you to all who participated this year in Martia Dementia. In 2023, we received a record number of bracket submissions, 740 entries, which means that competition was quite strong! First place resulted in a tie: congratulations to Magistra Farkas’s Latin 2 class at Belmont High School (Belmont, MA) and Derek Sanders, teacher at Great Bridge High School (Chesapeake, VA). Krystal Kubichek’s combined Latin 1 classes at Walnut Hills High School (Cincinnati, OH) took home third prize. Notably, this entry was one of the few top-scoring brackets that correctly selected Cerberus as the overall champion! Finally, laurels for achieving the most abysmal bracket go to a student participant at Piedmont Classical High School (Browns Summit, NC).

Once again, thank you to all participants, who helped make this year’s contest a resounding success. Have strong feelings about this year’s winners? Hope to see a particular ancient figure featured in next year’s contest? Tweet @BCPublishers what and who you would like to see and include the hashtag #MartiaDementia or give feedback in the comments below. We would love to hear from you!

Winner Derek Sanders and some of his students.


Martia Dementia 2023


After eight years of spring campaigns—in which gods, monsters, birds, authors, and military commanders struggled on the
Martia Dementia battle field—we’re back, with the ninth annual contest! Last year, some bloodthirsty birds defeated a slew of ancient authors, with the poisonous ducks of Pontus gaining victory over Rome’s sacred chickens. In 2023, mythical monsters are back, and ready to take on a new set of rivals, gods and goddesses. In keeping with the theme of the 2022–2023 Roman Calendar, these Martia Dementia competitors represent the non-Olympians, those deities that might personify important concepts, inspire daily worship, or offer divine revelation through initiation into their mysteries.

See the downloadable, printable PDF of the Roman Calendar here, showcasing artwork and imagery associated with twelve of this year’s Martia Dementia participants. For a variety of mythical monster activities, scroll to the bottom of our Distance Learning page to find an online matching game, printable templates to create a Guess Who?–style board game, and more.

To the victor—whoever finishes with the best bracket—belong the spoils. Before getting to the prizes, here is how the competition will work. Please read through the process carefully. For reference, we are providing a PDF of the bracket that you can use with your classes, but be sure to submit your final choices via the online system.

The Bracket

Starting today, complete and submit a bracket to be eligible for wondrous prizes. Please access and submit your bracket online via the following link: Martia Dementia 2023 Bracket. You can also find the bracket at the bottom of this blog post.

When you access the online Martia Dementia bracket, click the “Submit your bracket!” button to start making your selections. You will be prompted to enter your name and email address; we need this information so that we can track and notify the winners of the competition once Martia Dementia is completed. After signing up, you will be asked to predict a winner for each game in the bracket.  

For each round, you view a set of contestants that will "face off" against one another. Predict and select your winner for each "contest" in the bracket. 

At the bottom of this post, you will find a link to a PDF showing short descriptions of each of this year’s Martia Dementia participants. You can access the same descriptions by clicking on the photo of a given figure in the bracket.

Clicking on a god or monster will bring up a short description.

Once you have completed all of your selections and have submitted your bracket, you will receive a notice thanking you for your submission. If you would like to view your prediction bracket, simply click on the link to “View My Prediction.” We recommend saving a copy of your bracket at this point so that you can keep track of how you are doing as the competition progresses. With our online submission system, you can also easily share your prediction bracket via email or social media—a great way to show off how you’re doing, or earn some pity points if your bracket is going poorly. 

We are also providing a PDF copy of the bracket here (for reference only) in case you would like to print a copy of the bracket and fill one in with your class. However, we are not accepting scanned brackets, so make sure that you also submit the bracket online.

Brackets will be accepted through Wednesday, March 15 (the Ides of March!).

The Survey

A voting survey will be made available on Thursday, March 16, where you can vote for your picks. Whichever figures have the most votes by the time the survey closes will advance through the round. Actively participating in the survey betters your chances at winning. We will announce via social media when voting for each round has opened.

We cannot stress enough the importance of voting. When the survey goes live, cast your votes! Get your friends to vote for your picks. Teachers, get your students to stuff the survey with favorable votes!

Victori Spolia

This competition is not solely for bringing glory to your favorite ancient writer or bird. Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers is offering book prizes for the brackets that most closely resemble the final results; a $100 book credit will be awarded to the first-place participant, a $50 credit to the second-place participant, and a $25 credit to the third-place participant. Feeling like you no longer stand a chance? Do not give up! There will also be a $25 credit for having the most abysmal bracket! 

Stay Connected

Be sure to bookmark this post and check back here to access the link to the voting bracket. Also, follow us on Facebook and Twitter for updates as the competition progresses.

Remember, brackets close March 15, and the first round of voting will begin March 16.                                   

Bracket and Other Resources

Access the online bracket

Access a printable bracket (for reference only) 

Access a description of all Martia Dementia 2023 figures

Voting Schedule:

·         Round 1: March 16–17

·         Round 2: March 18–21

·         Round 3 (Sweet 16): March 23–24

·         Quarterfinals (Elite 8): March 25–28

·         Semifinals (Final 4): March 30–31

·         Final (Championship): April 1–4

Note that each round of voting will open at 7:30 a.m. central time and close at 4:00 p.m. central time on the designated days. 

 

 

 

Poisonous Ducks Win: Martia Dementia 2022 Recap

 

Martia Dementia 2022 featured a fierce competition, pitting humans against avian foes. Our ancient author field covered writers from Athens to Rome and beyond, some quite archaic (Homer, Sappho), and some relatively more modern (Perpetua, Augustine). Whether poets, historians, playwrights, or philosophers, these writers wielded their all-mighty pens—styli?—against mythological winged creatures, ominous raptors, domestic fowl of note, and more.

The championship was hotly contested by the sacred
chickens of Rome and the poisonous ducks of Pontus. 

Round one saw the advancement of Homer, easily defeating the eagle of Zeus, then later the ossifragus, the bonebreaker bird. While comic Plautus and saintly poet Aelia Eudocia fell out of the competition early on, Menander rallied against the ostrich, known to the ancients as the sparrow-camel. Apollonius of Rhodes failed in his foray against the famed harpies, whom he had described attacking the Argonauts in his own epic. Meanwhile, Seneca the Younger could not repel the sacred chickens of Rome, who proved blessed by the gods. Roman poets Vergil, Lucretius, and Ovid did quite well, however, as did several historians and the mathematician and scientist Perpetua.

Poets continued to hold their own against birds large and small: Homer was able to overtake the sirens, the bird-women of the Odyssey, before matching up with (and winning against) Catullus. Vergil, who handily beat last year’s champion, the phoenix, continued into round three—where the powerful pulli, the sacred chickens, were too formidable. Of all the authors, Ovid came the closest to winning the contest, but in the semifinals, he succumbed to King Mithridates’s poisonous ducks. The final battle in the championship round was bird vs. bird, as the sacred chickens of Rome fought the poisonous ducks of Pontus beak and nail. While Rome famously defeated Pontus, the same was not true of each respective state’s representative birds. The poisonous ducks brought down the sacred chickens, reigning victorious in Martia Dementia 2022! If you'd like to see the full bracket results, you can access them here.

Thank you to all who participated this year in Martia Dementia. Our top scorer was Charlie White of Trinity Valley School in Fort Worth, TX. Second place goes to Alek Balassa of New Trier Township High School in Winnetka, IL. Rounding out the top three: Magistra Farkas’s Latin 2 class at Belmont High School in Belmont, MA. Congrats to these astute winners, who all selected their bracket matches with care and great forethought. In contrast, Ava Stumpf of New Trier Township High School achieved the most abysmal bracket, barely progressing past the first round of voting.

Once again, thank you to all participants, who helped make this year’s contest a resounding success. Have strong feelings about this year’s winners? Hope to see a particular ancient figure featured in next year’s contest? Tweet @BCPublishers what and who you would like to see and include the hashtag #MartiaDementia or give feedback in the comments below. We would love to hear from you!

Martia Dementia 2022

Diffugere nives, redeunt iam gramina campis
    arboribusque comae.

The snows have fled, now the grass returns to the fields
    and the leaves to the trees. (Horace, 4.7.1–2)

As we emerge from the cold, snowy days of winter, we not only encounter the greenery and renewal that springtime heralds: we also embark on our yearly Martia Dementia celebrations, now in their eighth year! In 2021, the best military commanders of the ancient world met their match in competition with birds. Shockingly, the birds emerged triumphant, and the immortal phoenix took (and perhaps burned to ashes) the laurel wreath. This year, the birds are back and ready to flaunt their fearlessness. Their challengers? Ancient Greek and Roman writers, in part inspired by our newest Explore Latin reader on theater and comedy! In Explore Latin: Lūdī Scaenicī by Christopher Bungard, information is presented about playwrights and poets like Menander, Livius Andronicus, Ennius, Plautus, and Terence. These authors, and many more, will now have to prove their Martia Dementia mettle. 

To the victor—whoever finishes with the best bracket—belong the spoils. Before getting to the prizes, here is how the competition will work. Please read through the process carefully: this year we will continue to use an online bracket and voting system. For reference, we are providing a PDF of the bracket that you can use with your classes, but be sure to submit your final choices via the online system.

The Bracket

Starting today, complete and submit a bracket to be eligible for wondrous prizes. Please access and submit your bracket online via the following link: Martia Dementia 2022 Bracket. 

 

When you access the online Martia Dementia bracket, click the “Submit your bracket!” button to start making your selections. You will be prompted to enter your name and email address; we need this information so that we can track and notify the winners of the competition once Martia Dementia is completed. After signing up, you will be asked to predict a winner for each game in the bracket. 



At the bottom of this post, you will find a link to a PDF showing short descriptions of each of this year’s Martia Dementia participants. You can access the same descriptions by clicking on the photo of a given figure in the bracket.

 


Once you have completed all of your selections and have submitted your bracket, you will receive a notice thanking you for your submission:

If you would like to view your prediction bracket, simply click on the link to “View My Prediction.” We recommend saving a copy of your bracket at this point so that you can keep track of how you are doing as the competition progresses. With our online submission system, you can also easily share your prediction bracket via email or social media—a great way to show off how you’re doing, or earn some pity points if your bracket is going poorly. 

We are also providing a PDF copy of the bracket here (for reference only) in case you would like to print a copy of the bracket and fill one in with your class. However, we are not accepting scanned brackets this year, so make sure that you also submit the bracket online.

Brackets will be accepted through March 16.

The Survey

A voting survey will be made available on March 17, where you can vote for your picks. Whichever figures have the most votes by the time the survey closes will advance through the round. Actively participating in the survey betters your chances at winning. We will announce via social media when voting for each round has opened.

We cannot stress enough the importance of voting. When the survey goes live, cast your votes! Get your friends to vote for your picks. Teachers, get your students to stuff the survey with favorable votes!

Victori Spolia

This competition is not solely for bringing glory to your favorite ancient writer or bird. Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers is offering book prizes for the brackets that most closely resemble the final results; a $100 book credit will be awarded to the first-place participant, a $50 credit to the second-place participant, and a $25 credit to the third-place participant. Feeling like you no longer stand a chance? Do not give up! There will also be a $25 credit for having the most abysmal bracket! 

Stay Connected

Be sure to bookmark this post and check back here to access the link to the voting bracket. Also, follow us on Facebook and Twitter for updates as the competition progresses.

Remember, brackets close March 16, and the first round of voting will begin March 17.

Bracket and Other Resources

Access the online bracket
Access a printable bracket (for reference only) 
Access a description of all Martia Dementia 2022 figures

Access a short explainer on submitting a bracket


Voting Schedule

  • Round 1: March 17–18
  • Round 2: March 19–22
  • Round 3 (Sweet 16): March 24–25
  • Quarterfinals (Elite 8): March 26–29
  • Semifinals (Final 4): March 31–April 1
  • Final (Championship): April 4–6

Note that each round of voting will open at 7:30 a.m. central time and close at 4:00 p.m. central time on the designated days. 

 

 

 
 
 

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Links you can Use

Here are some helpful, pedagogical links for Classicists:

Lydia Fassett teaches high school Latin and gave a great presentation on Latin and classroom technology at the 2010 Classical Association of New England annual meeting. Take a look at all of the contemporary resources she used here.

Dr. Rick LaFleur, eClassics member and University of Georgia professor, leads a Latin teaching methods class online. This semester's methods class is up & running, with a dozen or so students enrolled from across the U.S. For info, interested persons should go here. Surf around, and especially click on OVERVIEW in the middle of the home page.

Patron saint of oral Latin, Dr. Terry Tunberg of the University of Kentucky, offers this link to videos of impromptu conversational Latin, with accents placed with 100% accuracy.

The Association for Latin Teaching (ArLT) in the UK publishes a lively blog which you can read here.

The American Philological Association (APA) sponsored its first-ever podcasting panel in 2009. Listen to the podcasts and leave feedback by clicking here.

eClassics member Evan Millner is prolific in the UK with a number of fun and practical Latin-language websites:

1) Schola is an all-Latin language, informal social network. Do visit Schola and participate!

2) Latinum is an extensive site containing hundreds of lessons in spoken Classical Latin, based on a free pdf textbook. In addition, Latinum provides vocabulary drills, and a wide range of Classical and other readings. Over one million audio downloads in its first year, and steadily growing in popularity. Visit the site by clicking here!

3) Imaginum Vocabularium is an image-based site to help with vocabulary learning. Visit this unique and helpful site here.

Scholiastae , a new wiki, is intended as a way for people to share their own scholia on classical works. Thanks to William Annis for this new site.

French Latinists unite! See what's happening with oral Latin in France by clicking here.

eClassics member Danja Mahoney (aka Magistra M), blogs about teaching Latin in the 21st century and focuses on technology and teaching. Visit her blog here, or read it via the RSS feed on the left.

Perlingua.com is a great free resource for Latin teachers containing games, PowerPoint slideshows, audio, video, and more, for a variety of Latin textbooks.

Check out eClassics member, M. Fletcher's, Facebook group, "Latin & Greek: Listen and Learn".

AKWN.NET: From Dr. Juan Coderch at the University of St. Andrews comes the news of the world in ancient Greek! Click here to read.

Latinitas Viva!: eClassics member Stefano runs a Latin-languages website and blog which is really worth spending some time exploring. Click here to get there.

The Vatican's Latin-language version of its website is now live. Check it out here.

One goal of many Classics students is to gain an advanced degree in philology and/or archaeology. To that end, the good people over at the Classical Journal have provided a comprehensive list of graduate study programs both in North America and abroad. They have also published on-line a comprehensive guide on how and where to present scholarly papers at conferences. Both of these outstanding resources can be found by clicking here.

The Classical Journal, published by CAMWS (the Forum section is dedicated to pedagogy).

An article on technology and Classics pedagogy, "From Slate to Tablet PC: Using New Technologies to Teach and Learn Latin and Greek", has been published as an on-line exclusive to the Classical Journal (CAMWS). Written by eClassics founder and Director of eLearning for Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, Andrew Reinhard, the article covers a wide spectrum of digital tools for the contemporary Classicist to use in (and out) of the classroom. The article has been peer-reviewed and edited and appears as part of the CJ Forum which is dedicated to Classics pedagogy.

Speaking of the Classical Association of the Middle West and South (CAMWS), do pay a visit to their page for the Committee for the Promotion of Latin for helpful links to "emergency kits for programs in crisis", funding opportunities, and CPL Online, a "national peer-reviewed journal on all facets of Latin teaching at all levels...".

Excellence Through Classics is a standing committee of the American Classical League for the promotion and support of Elementary, Middle School &
Introductory Classics Programs.

The Iris Project (and Iris magazine) is a UK-based initiative to promote Classics to anyone and everyone. From their homepage: "This magazine is part of a wider initiative, the iris project, which was founded in the belief that the opportunity to learn about the fascinating languages, literature, histories and art of the Ancient World should be made available to all, regardless of background. This initiative seeks to awaken and nurture an interest in the Classics by making it accessible and appealing to a broad audience." This is a great program -- please visit!

For Latin teachers and students who wish to test their conversational mettle with other Latin speakers worldwide, click here to join a UK-based group that regularly speaks using Skype, an on-line phone service.

All Vergil all the time at virgilius.org! Links to Vergil teacher pages, quote of the day, and more.

The American School of Classical Studies' Blegen Library has a blog managed by eClassics member Chuck Jones. See what's new at the library by clicking here.

N. S. Gill has a handy blog on Classics and ancient history on about.com, updated several times a day.

A clearinghouse of articles on ancient history, along with images of inscriptions, art, and archaeology, covering the whole of Mediterranean civilization can be found at Livius.org.

Speaking of blogging, there is a Roman cooking blog here by a student at Evergreen State College (Olympia, Washington).

For a revolutionary take on Latin reading and comprehension, take a look at Paul Latimer O'Brien's site, Visual Latin.

One of our members, Manolis Tzortzis, worked as a researcher at the Center for Greek Language. See what's new here (and via the RSS feed on the left).

Greek-Language.com
is a one-stop resource for grammars and other learning materials for varying levels of students of Classical and Koine Greek.

Looking for Latin primary texts already on-line (without having to go to Perseus)? Try this metasite hosted by Georgetown University for both Classical and Medieval Latin. Georgetown also has a bonanza of links to Latin manuscripts, too, for those folks interested in paleography as a pedagogical tool.

Dr. Cora Sowa has created a project planning toolkit for literary scholars (and specific tools for completing specific tasks including cluster analysis). Find out more about the Loom of Minerva by clicking here.

A vulgate Latin blog with podcasts can be accessed here. Scottus Barbarus (J. Scott Olsson) has made this resource available to all -- quite worth a listen!

From Lithuania comes Carmina Latina, two MP3 tracks from Catullus and Flaccus, beautifully arranged and voiced by Julija Butkevičiūtė, singer and Latin student.

OK, here's yet another Latin podcast link to Haverford College which has a clearinghouse of Latin podcast links. The link to links.

Dr. Laura Gibbs out of the University of Oklahoma regularly blogs on Latin pedagogy on her site, Bestiaria Latina. Check out the list of Latin books for children, Latin puzzles (sudoku, anyone?), and more! Laura also has two other cool sites for anyone interested in fun ways to learn Latin: Latin crossword puzzles and Latin via fables.

Got podcasts? Dr. Chris Francese does. As an Associate Professor of Classical Languages at Dickinson College, he produces high-quality Latin poetry podcasts with regularity. Listen here. Scroll to the bottom of his blog to subscribe via iTunes.

Dr. Francese has also been experimenting with the idea of presenting Latin texts with translation and/or commentary in wiki format. The sample in the link below is the little dialogue about going to school from Colloquia Monacensia. The link is: http://wiki.dickinson.edu/index.php?title=Colloquia_Monacensia

Rogue Classicism, posted by David Meadows , is probably the most complete resource for up-to-the-second media coverage of all things Classical, plus regular features like "Words of the Day" and "This Day in Ancient History".

Electronic Resources for Classicists, a meta-site.

Of special interest to “wired” Classicists, the daily blog on stoa.org is an invaluable source of news, calls for papers, and interesting projects all involving technology and the Classics.

eClassics member Pieter Jansegers administers this link farm for Latinists from Belgium. That is to say, he's from Belgium. Any Latinist can use his links!

Rob Latousek is the president of Centaur Systems software, a company he founded in 1984. His company produces Classics-themed software ranging from dictionaries to tours of archaeological sites.

Julian Morgan could be considered to by Rob Latousek's UK counterpart, and has been involved in connecting the two worlds of Classics and ICT for years. Visit his site, and read his article (in PDF) on "A Good Practice Guide for the use of ICT in Classics Teaching".

The Digital Classicist discussion list covers everything from picking a professional-grade image scanner to calls for papers, managed from King’s College, London.

My publisher, Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, Inc., has a variety of forums discussing everything from Gilgamesh to Uses and Abuses of the Classics. Join the discussion by clicking here.

Rose Williams has been teaching Latin "for a very long time" (her words) to anyone who will listen. You can benefit from her experience by downloading the numerous PDF handouts she has posted on her new web site, roserwilliams.com.

Humanist is an international electronic seminar on humanities computing and the digital humanities. Its primary aim is to provide a forum for discussion of intellectual, scholarly, pedagogical, and social issues for exchange of information among members. It is an affiliated publication of the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS).

iPodius
is a digital download store for Latin and Greek audio, video, and software, managed by Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers.



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