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A Delight I found today. This is a simple dialogue called Familiarium Colloquiorum Formulae, graecè et latinè. Cebetis,... Dialogus qui [...] inscribitur, cum latina interpretatione. @ hoc est : feli…

A Delight I found today. This is a simple dialogue called
Familiarium Colloquiorum Formulae, graecè et latinè. Cebetis,... Dialogus qui [...] inscribitur, cum latina interpretatione. @ hoc est : felium et murium pugna, tragaedia graeca, nunc primum Latinitate donata. @ , hoc est : Ranarum ac murium pagna Homeri, unà cum scholiis Philippi Melanchtonis antehoc nunquam editis. Elipsii Galentii amphratensis, de Cello ranarum et murium Lebri tres Andreae Guarnae de bello intergrammaticae reges, de principatú orationis Liber I. (III calend. septemb. 1541.) - - 1542
I have never come across a parallel Latin Greek dialogue for beginners, this could be a useful text. Certainly, the Latin part of it is very good, as it is pitched low. I would say, of all the colloquia I have come across, this is about third up the rung in difficulty. Such elementary colloquia are few and far between.

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Comment by Laura Gibbs on February 15, 2009 at 11:45pm
Evan, is this the same text as Pseudo-Dositheus at Bibliotheca Augustana (already digitized!)...??? (there is some Aesop attributed to Dositheus, which is how I had come across this text at Bib. Augustana):
http://www.hs-augsburg.de/~Harsch/Chronologia/Lspost03/Dositheus/do...
(Greek and Latin, facing - I think the one in the book you have found is the Colloquia Monacensia, but I was just doing a quick comparison)
:-)
Comment by Laura Gibbs on February 15, 2009 at 11:50pm
Aha, yes, I think that is it - there's a critical edition with notes at Google Books. Fun stuff!!!!
Comment by Latinum Institute on February 16, 2009 at 3:51am
Ah, much better.
The Google books edition needs a proxy server to access outside the USA.
Thanks,
Evan.
Comment by Laura Gibbs on February 16, 2009 at 7:51am
Oh, now that is very interesting... I sometimes get warning from Project Gutenberg in Australia that a text is public domain in Australia and not public domain in U.S. (the Doctor Doolittle books, for example), but it's never required a proxy server.
For what it's worth, I've noticed that two of the Aesops I used last summer that were full preview have been switched to no view at all; it makes me think I should be download everything as PDF, just in case - but there are so many books I use at GoogleBooks.
Anyway, it's great stuff. For people doing Classics, the more and more we can get of those 19th century odd critical editions, the better! :-)

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