eLatin eGreek eLearn

More wired than a Roman Internet café

Today I started a small tutorial group of students on Conversational Greek. About 12 people showed up, entirely voluntarily, so that was a good start. All have had between 1-3 years Koine behind them, but the experience of listening to Greek to try and comprehend was quite new for all of them. I began with some simple expressions of greeting, asking names, some objects, etc.. I'm looking forward to continuing to meet with them, tossing up whether to go into some TPR type activities, or use A Greek Boy at Home as a basis for TPRS stuff, maybe a mix of both. If you have any links to useful resources for conversational and active Greek, I'd love to hear from you (even if you tell me about something I already know/have, that would be fine!)

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Comment by maximus on January 22, 2009 at 6:25pm
i've got one thing you can try, especially if your students have some latin: You could build conversations from the Hermeneumata Pseudodositheana.
It's the way the Hellenistic Greek speakers quickly got up to speed coping with the new Roman beaurocacy.
http://www.hs-augsburg.de/~harsch/Chronologia/Lspost03/Dositheus/dos_col0.html
Comment by Keith Rogers on July 13, 2009 at 8:37am
I suspect you have heard about this already but W.H.D.Rouse's Direct Method materials on the teaching of Greek ‘A Greek Boy at Home’ and his ‘First Greek Course’ are being revised by Anne Mahoney at Tufts University and are to be published by Focus -- http://www.pullins.com – early in 2010. I am hoping to use them as the basis of a TPRS beginners Greek course.

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