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Online classics at the University of Connecticut

Salvete! I'm excited to update some information I posted a while back about the University of Connecticut's Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies program's online offerings.

This spring I'll be offering an online advanced Greek course, CAMS 3101 Topics in Advanced Greek, for three credits, on selections from Plato. The course will be offered in a game-based format, in which students will participate as senior operatives on a mission to infiltrate the Academy and discover the nature of *philosophia* as a practice within Athenian culture. As senior operatives, in addition to the operational briefings they receive from reading the Platonic dialogues in the original, student-operatives will have the opportunity to assist the students in another online course, CAMS 3207, who will be on the same mission, reading selected Greek philosophical writings in English, and also learning basic Greek. Student-operatives will play as modern classics students, but will also assume the roles of Athenians in 390BCE. The course, as you can imagine, is going to be very different from what most students are used to, and so I'm eager to discuss the learning objectives, activities, and assessments with anyone who thinks he or she might be interested.

In the second summer session of 2011 (6 weeks, July through August), I'll be offering an online advanced Latin course, CAMS 3102 Topics in Advanced Latin, for three credits, on selections from Horace and Ovid. This course, also, will be taught in a game-based format, in which students play as operatives on a mission to save modern culture by discovering the nature of the erotic choices of Augustan Rome, through study of Horace's Odes, Satires, and Epodes, and Ovid's Amores and Ars Amatoria. Student-operatives will play as modern classics students, but will also assume the roles of young Romans in 7-8CE. As with CAMS 3101, this format will be non-standard, to say the least; I'm eager to discuss its learning objective, activities, and assessments with any potential students.

The game-based format of these courses is being developed in association with colleagues at the Neag School of Education, and represents an application of what I consider the most exciting developments in educational psychology today. I'd be very happy to discuss my work on games and culture, and to point the way to helpful scholarship on games and learning, with anyone who'd like to get in touch.

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